Mount Bourgeau

Dead organic matter falls into the water and sinks to the bottom to the delight of the waiting bacteria. The hungry bacteria feeds on this matter, in turn releasing methane gas. Which floats upward, coming in contact with frozen water, forming the various frozen ice bubbles. 

 

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Bourgeau

Mount Rundle

March has been a rollercoaster of weather, winter to spring to winter and now we are having spring again. This picture was taken during the winter part of the month, all covered by snow again. But by end of that day, we were back into spring.

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Rundle

Massive Range

Over the years I have taken many pictures while walking to and from work. Being addicted to nature photography, it`s hard not to carry a camera at all times, being ready when the opportunity arises. In this case it was in the morning and I was half way to work when I looked toward the Massive Range, about 15 Kilometers away from me. The peaks I see most morning were lit up with the first light and I only had few minutes before the low clouds above would block the light. More than enough time to get the picture and another reason to keep carrying my camera. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Massive Range

Red Squirrel

It was just few days ago when it was and as well felt like winter, how things have changed so fast. It was during one of those winter days I came across this red squirrel perched on a branch and eating the seeds from a spruce cone.

Until next moment,

Amar

Red Squirrel

Three-toed Woodpecker

The Three-toed Woodpecker is the most often spotted woodpecker here in Banff National Park, found year around. Boreal forests and montane coniferous forests is their preferred habitat. Diet preference are insects, dominated by wood-boring beetle larvae, also happy to eat fruits and feed on tree sap. So the nest time you are in their habitat and hear a soft chipping sound, stop, locate the direction of the sound and step over to watch the woodpecker scale off flakes of bark to get at insects. 

 

Until next moment, 

Amar

Three-toed Woodpecker

Elk

It was a cold morning when I came across four male elk, the other two are just outside the frame. It had been a very cold night, so as soon as the sunshine hit the valley, they moved into it. Every bit helps. 

Until next moment,

Amar

Elk

Mount Rundle

It was late afternoon when I took this picture of Mount Rundle from the vermilion lakes. It was the different blues that attracted me to take the picture and the foreground ice on top of the wood helped make it a better picture.

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Rundle

Moose

For moose winter is about suffering and overcoming that suffering. Moose can handle cold, their large body is made just for that. It's about the food or more accurately the lack of nutritious food.  Twigs are the main part of their winter diet, nowhere close to providing the nutrients they get from eating leaves during the summer. Now add the challenge of moving through the deep snow to get at the twigs. So it's no wonder that moose lose weight each day during the winter. But at the end of this winter as end of all winters, most will live to see spring. 

Until next moments, 

Amar

Moose

Cascade to Rundle

When you live in the town of Banff and can't get away, beautiful sunrises are  not far away. I was in between things and decided to take a break and watch the sunset from the town. I was standing on the frozen Bow River trying to come up with a interesting composition, front of me the sky was on fire. So I decided to capture as much of the view as possible. Took several pictures from left to right and then created this panorama of a beautiful sunrise.  

 

Until next moment, 
Amar

Cascade to Rundle

Coyote

I came across this coyote in the morning, just before I was seeing various tracks including of a coyote. Shortly after I came across this male who came out of the woods just ahead of me and kept moving front of me. I just happen to be going in the same direction, I kept my distance until he stopped. I stopped as well and watched him as he listened for a possible prey underneath the snow just front of him. In the end no food. he then started to move again, soon he was out of sight.

Until next moment,

Amar

Coyote

Cascade Mountain

With nature you take what you get. I was expecting with the sun setting behind me to light up the top of Cascade Mountain. But nature had other plans, the low clouds behind me came into play. Blocking the light from hitting the peak but soon after the clouds above Cascade lit up. In the end I got my picture.

Until next moment,

Amar

Cascade Mountain

Northern Shrike

This masked feathered friend goes by the name of Northern Shrike. Comes down to southern Canada and northern United Sates during the winter. It's a predator, feeding on birds, mammals and insects and also considered a songbird. Shrikes use their pecking skills to kill their prey and if the prey is too large to hold in their talons, they will impale them for easy eating or for snack at a later time. 

Until next moment, 

Amar

Northern Shrike

Moon over Massive Range

Few mornings back I was watching the moon as it made its way back of the Massive Range. The Massive mountain range all covered with fresh snow, creating a beautiful winter morning. There was more then enough light on the moon and still mostly clear of the clouds. And just before the moon disappeared behind the clouds, I took the picture.

Until next moment,

Amar

Moon over Massive Range

American Marten

If you happen to  surprise a American marten, one of three things can happen. It may just stay there and watch you, run away or it may climb a tree. They are very good climbers and it's a great way to get away from the predators. In this case the marten went up a pine tree. I stayed put as it effortlessly climbed and looked toward me. Once it was certain that I was not coming any closer, it slowly came down and again kept looking toward me. One reaching the ground it then ran away. 

 

Until next moment, 
Amar

American Marten

Moose

We are well into 2017, its time to look back at 2016, through pictures. Taking place on Saturday, February the 11th, from 7 to 9 PM at the Cave and Basin NHS, the birthplace of our national parks, in Banff. Come join me as I share some of my favourite pictures from 2016 and the stories that go with them, for $3.90 per person. 

Until next moment, 
 

Amar

Moose