Mountain Bluebird

One of the highlight of birding in Banff National Park is having a chance to see the beautiful Mountain Bluebird. I came across this male in a meadow, first spotted perched on top of a burned stump. Its bright colour got my attention and I quickly snapped several pictures. It was looking toward the ground, searching for insects to feed on. After few minutes it found a snack and then it found a different perch. Providing a better picture.

 


Until nest moment, 

Amar

Mountain Bluebird

Black Bear

A black bear family of three, they were busy eating the green vegetation that's starting to pop up on the valley's bottom. With the warmer weather the bears have more and more options for food and they are spreading out in the valley.

Until next moment,

Amar

Black Bear

Red-necked Grebe

I was watching two red-necked Grebes diving for food in the Bow River, they feed on fish, crustaceans, insects and few other aquatic related food items. They also ingest large quantities of their own feathers like the other grebes. Still no clear idea why they do that  and why they feed their feathers to their young. It might be to protect the lower digestive tract from hard indigestible material. The morning I got this picture, I was just happy to get a good photo during a morning snow fall. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Red-necked Grebe

Northern Lights

Most of the times when we get northern Lights in Banff, we don't see the colours, just a glow in the northern sky. This was the case few weeks back when I decided to go out and take pictures of it. My camera's sensor being more powerful than my eyes, they were able to pick up the green. Then it was matter of finding some open water and compose a picture.

Until next moment,

Amar

Northern Lights

Great Blue Heron

In the morning I came across this Great Blue Heron fishing on the side of the Bow River. I watched from a distance as it caught two fish, both the same size as the one in its mouth. After it caught the two, things slowed down. It kept moving to different parts of the river but no luck. It finally decided to fly away.

Until next moment,

Amar

Great Blue Heron

Mount Rundle

The last few weeks I have been spending lot of time around the Bow Valley, near the water. That's where many of the birds can be  found, they are my main focus during the spring bird migration. But I do cheat. I was hanging out by the Vermilion Lakes, waiting for the sun to rise. Bird photography does not start until  I have light, until then I can take pictures of the sunrises. There was a light breeze creating ripples in the water. I kept my fingers crossed the wind would stop. This time mother nature listened, the clouds lit up, water was clam and the mountains were covered with fresh snow in April. 

Until next moment, 

Amar

Mount Rundle

Grizzly

More and more bears are up from their winter sleep, but winter is taking its time to leave. April was full of small and large snow storms, providing challenges for the early risers.

Until next moment,

Amar

Grizzly

Mount Rundle

We have been getting more snow in April, many of times waking up with the mountains and as well the bottom of the valley covered with it. Few weeks back before looking for and taking pictures of birds, I decided to get few pictures of the sunrise at 3rd Vermilion Lake. It was a great morning, not only in the direction where the sun was rising but as will in the opposite direction.

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Rundle

Moose and Mount Rundle

Mount Rundle is one of the most photographed mountain in Banff National Park, throughout the day and during the nights. Pictures are taken from few different location, but most are from the Vermilion Lakes, which are easily accessible by foot, bike and by a vehicle. Summer is the season when the mountain gets the most attention, but lately more and more during the other seasons as well. My favourite time to take pictures of the mountain is when there is drama in the sky and the water is still during sunrises and sunsets. But every now and then a great opportunity presents it self during the middle of the day. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Moose and Mount Rundle

Moose

The calf still enjoying the safety of its mom, if the mother is pregnant, the calf will be pushed away in few months. For now life is good and with warmer weather better food is on its way.

Until next moment,

Amar

Moose

Canada Geese

The birds have been migrating back for a while, but now its full on. It seems everyday another bird is heard calling out, on the water, in the forest and  in the sky. Even if you are not a birder, its great to hear all those calls. Every chance I get I'm out there, looking for those who nest in the park and those who are just passing by. The Banff Community Birdwalk kicks of tomorrow, let the fun begin.

Until next moment,

Amar

Canada Goose

Massive Range

Calm water has to be a friend when taking landscape pictures. It played a large role making this picture stand out. Almost as if the water was not calm, half the beauty would not be in the picture. The sun was rising behind me, giving light to the sky, clouds and some of the peaks. All that reflected in the calm water.

Until next moment,

Amar

Massive Range

Coyote

On a cold morning I was walking through deep snow, on a tail that was not well used, following my own tracks from the day before to same energy. Soon after I noticed tracks crisscrossing mine, belonging to a coyote from that morning. Being lesser in weight, it was able to walk on the snow crust, saving energy as it searched for food. After about hundred meters, the coyote tracks went off into the woods, but five minutes later well ahead of me I spot a coyote, thinking it must be the same one as he walked over a small bridge. In no hurry, I placed my camera in my hands and crossed the same bridge I was headed for. My plans was to go straight but not before looking toward the slow moving coyote to the left of me, who was listening for sounds underneath the snow before giving me a quick look. He easily moved across the snow and was soon out of sight, I continued on the trail. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Coyote

Grizzly

How time flies, in 2006 I took my first picture of a mammal, a pair of least chipmunks. In 2010 I took my very first picture of a grizzly bear, I was taking pictures of waterfowls when an adult female grizzly came into view. After few pictures she was gone. Since then I have seen many grizzlies and taken many more pictures. I can still  remember if it was just yesterday, taking that very first picture of a grizzly, being aware of my surrounding and being cautious as the beautiful bear let me share her space. That feeling was still there, heat beating little faster, when I took this picture of the first bear spotted up from deep sleep this year in Banff National Park. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar 

Grizzly

Mount Bourgeau

Dead organic matter falls into the water and sinks to the bottom to the delight of the waiting bacteria. The hungry bacteria feeds on this matter, in turn releasing methane gas. Which floats upward, coming in contact with frozen water, forming the various frozen ice bubbles. 

 

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Bourgeau

Mount Rundle

March has been a rollercoaster of weather, winter to spring to winter and now we are having spring again. This picture was taken during the winter part of the month, all covered by snow again. But by end of that day, we were back into spring.

Until next moment,

Amar

Mount Rundle

Massive Range

Over the years I have taken many pictures while walking to and from work. Being addicted to nature photography, it`s hard not to carry a camera at all times, being ready when the opportunity arises. In this case it was in the morning and I was half way to work when I looked toward the Massive Range, about 15 Kilometers away from me. The peaks I see most morning were lit up with the first light and I only had few minutes before the low clouds above would block the light. More than enough time to get the picture and another reason to keep carrying my camera. 

 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Massive Range