Barred Owl

There's no free ride for wildlife, but in this case it seems the two Barred Owls invited the harassment form the Black-billed Magpies. During the sunrise the two owls were calling out near the top of the trees. Soon seven magpies came over and waisted no time giving the owls hard time, quickly handing out aerials assaults. The two owls tried different tactics, one perched between branches and just took it for few minutes until the magpies moved on. This one was more agitated, moving from tree to a tree. The magpies were always right behind it, they almost seem to be delighted that their harassment was working. Finally after half an hour, the magpies had enough and flew away. 

Barred Owl

Barred Owl

The Barred Owl was not only out in the open but also calling out. So it did not take long before the magpies arrived and started harassing the owl. Magpies and other birds will harass any bird or mammals that will harm them or their nest. So when they have a chance, harassing is a normal reaction when predator are spotted.

Barred Owl 170521f Amar Athwal.jpg

Barred Owl

I was late heading home from work, looking forward to relaxing and eating. But I quickly forgot about food when I spotted this Barred Owl, it was time to grab few images. In this meeting the first few pictures I took were the keepers. The background was lit up with the setting sun, but the owl had its back turned to me, so I waited. Then for few seconds the owl looked toward me over its left shoulder, but the bonus was in its eye. A protective blue film covering showing, which the owls uses when flying through the woods and as a preventive measure against overly eager owlets. 


Until next moment, 

Amar

Barred Owl

Barred Owl

Spotted the owl early in the evening, resting, perched on a spruce tree. Waiting for dusk to set, when they started being active, hunting for voles and anything else that they may spot in the forest. They hunt small animals, but rodents are their primary focus.

Until next moment,

Amar

Barred Owl

Every year I'll come across few species of owls, often one of those tend to be the Barred Owl. Normally I'll locate them after I hear their call. In this case, I was heading home when I head a single note by the owl. The sound was coming from the direction I was headed, got my camera ready and started scanning the area front of me as I walked. Couple of minutes later I located the owl, took the pictures and then it was time to cook for me. 

Until next moment,

Amar

Barred Owl

Middle of a small forest of spruce trees, were rays of light streaking through, highlighting parts of trees and ground. One ray of light was show casing a Barred Owl perched half way up a tree. It was calling out and in the distance its mate was calling back. After a short while the mate landed on a nearby tree, I in the middle watched both of them. There would be long pauses between calls, but it was worth waiting for the beautiful sounds middle of the forest. After a while I left with memories and few good pictures.

Until next moment,

Amar

Barred Owl

There were two Barred Owls, calling out to each other. As they called, I tracked the one close to where I was standing. Just as I found where it was perched, the other flew into the area, they had a quick meet and greet then both perched near each other. Being late in the day, it was dark in the forest, I braced myself against a tree and got the shot of the one closer to me. Just enough light to get the details of the owl.

Until next moment,

Amar

Barred Owl

I was standing next to small wetland trying to take picture of Red winged Blackbirds, Common Yellowthroats and other birds that came into the area. The mosquitoes were taking a shot at me each time I took a picture. A short walk behind me, in the forest I could hear the call of an owl, a Barred Owl. It was cloudy and I thought there would not be enough light to take pictures of the owl, even if I could locate it. Clouds opened up and decided to go look for the owl. It kept calling out every few minutes, making it easier for me to locate it. Even with the clouds letting the late daylight into the forest, it just wasn't enough. Having no tripod, I found a location that gave me the best framing and leaned against a tree for stability and took few images each time I breathed out. After I got my pictures, I went back to the wetland and the owl had closed its eyes and turned away from me.

Until next moment,

Amar