Pine Grosbeak

It's challenging trying to take pictures of the birds in the winter in the mountains, but its worth it. When they are not top of the trees singing, Pine Grosbeaks come down looking for food. And when they do, that's my time to take their pictures. The females have the yellow colour and the males the red. I know they have moved in when I start hearing them in later part of the fall and that's when I start spending some time taking their pictures.

Pine Grosbeak 171227 Amar Athwal.jpg

Pine Grosbeak

Another Christmas Bird Count has come to an end in the Bow Valley. We started out with a cool morning, but layers of cloths and variety of chocolates fixed that. Two-third of the birds we saw were the White-winged Crossbills, no surprise there with the abundance of spruce cones throughout the valley. The crossbills have been all over the seeds the cones supply, this summer, fall and now the winter. It's hard to be out there and not hear the crossbills top of the trees. It was good day for us on our route, spotting thirteen species middle of the winter in the Canadian Rockies. I was not able to get any good pictures of the crossbills, but did of Pine Grosbeak.

Until next moment, 

Amar 

Pine Grosbeak

Pine Grosbeak

Today Christmas Bird Count took place out here, birders were scattered throughout the Bow Valley. I was joined by two lovely friends on this above average temperature day in December. Day started out slow, but once chocolate and christmas cookies were consumed, (it's hard being a birder), we started seeing birds. Before we called a day, we spotted 94 birds all together, consisting of 15 species, including this female Pine Grosbeak.

Until next moment,
Amar

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks

The attached pictures of the Pine Grosbeaks was taken a while back. Everything was set for me to take the picture, except for the light, it was coming from the back of the birds. So I over exposed the shot to get the details of the birds, in turn I lost some of the details in the snow but I got a beautiful back ground. I was happy with the trade-off.

Until next moment,

Amar

Pine Grosbeak

The rules say the picture should show the face and the eyes should be sharp. But sometime the rules need not to apply. In the end its what the photographer likes in his or her image. I liked the colours on this Pine Grosbeak and liked the angle of the bird that was captured. So in the end its about the feel, its that simple.

Until next moment,

Amar

Pine Grosbeak

I was walking on a trail when I heard a call of a bird. The week before I heard the same call, it was that of a Blue Jay. I stood and listened to see which direction it was coming from, and at the same time taking my camera out from the backpack.  The calls were coming from some 80 meters ahead, above the trees.  I made my way in that direction and started to locate the Blue Jay. There were number of Magpies in the area, which made sure their voice was heard as well. Soon spotted the Blue Jay, its calls were now drowned by the Magpies. The Blue Jay quickly moved on but not after I was able to get few images. I snapped few pictures of the magpies as well to keep them happy. After walking some more, I was hearing the calls of other Magpies, and sounds from the stream I was next to. Hidden among the sounds were calls of smaller birds. I stopped again and listened, the calls were competing for my ears with all the other sounds of nature and it was not even spring yet. After a minute or so I realized I was hearing Pine Grosbeaks, but locating them was another matter.  A lady and a man were making their way toward me on the trail as I kept looking for the grosbeaks. The sounds of the water and the Magpies were making it difficult.

Just as the couple got few steps from me, one of the grosbeak came out in the open and flew across the trail and landed on a dead branch. Perfect setting with clear sight of the bird, I quickly had my camera pointing at the bird and the couple stopped in their tracks. I snapped away several images before stopping to let the folks walk through. The bird soon flew away, but left questions marks on the faces of the couple. I thanked them for stopping and then explained about the Pine Grosbeak, as we together looked at the images I had taken, including the one with this email.

Until next moment,

Amar